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Dodging Product Development Failures, Part 3 – Integrated Team Work

October 16th, 2014
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There are many elements that lead to a successfully developed product; we’ve already covered two important factors: 1) Assessing all risks and going beyond prototype development and 2) developing an uncanny customer insight. In this post, I’ll discuss a third key element, the importance of teamwork.

Pitfall: Team activities that are not integrated
Product development depends on many different disciplines, including engineering, regulatory, marketing, manufacturing, finance, sales, and quality control. While these specialists bring a depth of expertise, you’ll need to integrate all of them. While a specialist will certainly be able to identify a task and complete it, she or he may balk at attending team meetings where the discussion is far outside her or his specialty. But the best teams are made of people who know how every discipline connects to the product. Only with an integrated team will you know what a customer really wants, have a superior sense of priorities, and gain the ability to shift attributes like price, time to market, or specific product features. Unfortunately, many groups who call themselves teams don’t have this level of connectedness.

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Dodging Healthcare Product Development Failures, Part 2 – Developing Uncanny Customer Insight

October 8th, 2014
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In product development, a lot of parts have to be working well for the whole project to succeed. In my last post, we talked about the need for a disciplined approach to developing a product, as well as the need to think beyond the prototype and its design. In this post, I’ll talk about another area of enormous importance to successful development—insight. Just as development isn’t just about product design, insight isn’t just about what your customers say.

Pitfall:  Insufficient customer insight
Truly disruptive innovations address a need that customers can barely articulate before being exposed to the product. Examples of this type of successful development abound; from smartphones to intermittent windshield wipers to single-use bioprocessing. None of these new products addressed a known, clearly expressed need, but in today’s world we couldn’t imagine living without them. While listening to customer ideas, complaints and expressed needs is necessary, product development can’t stop there. Many products that sound perfect during customer interviews end up unused (and unusable) in the real world. Developing something truly new and useful depends on an uncanny insight around what customers are trying to achieve, their environments and the capabilities of alternative technologies.

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Dodging Healthcare Product Development Failures, Part 1—Risk Assessment Trumps Design Devotion

September 25th, 2014
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A new healthcare product is an exciting thing. It could alter people’s lives, perhaps change the world, and maybe even earn some money. But what comes as a surprise to most people is how few of the many new product ideas actually make it to market.

 

There are a number of reasons why most products don’t survive; the development process is complicated and often counter-intuitive. However, in my experience, there are a few pitfalls that commonly trap product developers, but also ways to sidestep those pitfalls. This is by no means a comprehensive list, because every product is different and many things can trip up development. Often a project can be clicking on five cylinders and you need just one more to make it work. In this three-part post, we’ll look at common ways to kick start that extra cylinder.

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