Posts Tagged ‘biotech’



Agilent makes investment in Lasergen

March 8th, 2016
Posted by

3d_dna

Agilent is investing $80 million in our client Lasergen, an emerging biotechnology company with innovative next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology. The two companies will collaborate on building a NGS solutions workflow for clinical applications, based on Lasergen’s Lightning Terminators™ sequencing chemistry.

This recent investment showcases the trend toward new players and innovative technology in the NGS space, particularly as the technology moves to more routine clinical use.

Lasergen’s relationship with Agilent is another example of how Popper and Company helps companies create transformative business partnerships.

 

Save

Tags: , , ,
Posted in Diagnostics, Our Views | No Comments »





Diversigen, Baylor Miraca Form Partnership

February 26th, 2016
Posted by

 

clinical_studies

The recent partnership between Diversigen and Baylor Miraca Genetics highlights the importance of both human genetics and the microbiome in drug development and ultimately in clinical decision making.

We are in the early days of understanding the scope of the impact of the microbiome but we already know of powerful associations in diseases as diverse as inflammatory bowel disease, diabetes and cancer.

We are excited about this partnership as it leverages real technical and interpretive expertise across across a broad array of genomes relevant to human health.

Read more about their partnership.

Tags: , , , ,
Posted in biomedical research, Diagnostics | No Comments »





Single Cell Biology: A Step Toward Precision Diagnostics

January 21st, 2016
Posted by

The past several years have seen a dramatic increase in the ability to isolate and characterize single cells – leading to advances in diagnostics, drug discovery, stem cell biology, cancer, and many other areas of biomedical research.

These advances have arisen thanks to growing capabilities in various single cell “omics” technologies – which have enabled RNA and DNA sequencing on a genome-wide scale (the interrogation of proteins, metabolites, and many other types of molecules that provide information about cellular growth, differentiation, and the underlying molecular basis of disease).

And why has single cell technology become so attractive within the biomedical research community? Because most studies are currently hampered by sample heterogeneity.

Read the rest of this entry »

Tags: , , , , ,
Posted in biomedical research, Diagnostics, Our Views | 1 Comment »





Two Disparate Meetings – #CES2014 and #JPM2014: Each Addressing Healthcare’s Future

January 29th, 2014
Posted by

The 32nd annual JP Morgan Healthcare conference, held in San Francisco’s Westin St. Francis Hotel from January 13-16, was a posh affair by industry standards, with only select companies having been asked to present, investors as the key target audience, and a fertile ground for deal-making touted as the primary offering. An event characterized by (mostly) men in conservative suits, the 7,000+ attendees were jammed into the Westin’s narrow halls struggling to get a seat to hear the latest news from pharmaceutical, biotechnology and medical device manufacturers. Meanwhile, deal-making discussions, media interviews and satellite “meet-ups” occurred in the nooks and crannies of just about every hotel in a 5-block radius from the Westin.
 
Read the rest of this entry »

Tags: , ,
Posted in Events, Our Views | No Comments »





Investors May Back a Revolution, but It Takes the People to Start One

May 19th, 2011
Posted by

A recent article posted by Luke Timmerman of Xconomy.com paints a bleak picture for the state of biotech investment. He explains that the general public no longer views biotech as worthy of the almighty buzz factor, i.e., the magazine cover stories and TV morning shows so important to the elusive independent investor. He suggests that the biotechnology industry may never capture the public’s imagination again, a strong assertion considering the amazing things happening in genomic research, companion diagnostics, medical technology, telemedicine and other parts of the sector. But is the buzz factor the only thing that matters in an age of consumer empowerment? What about the equally powerful phenomenon of simply going viral?
 
In some ways Mr. Timmerman’s article, in which he speaks of investor excitement for TECHnology versus BIOTECHnology, may not present a fair comparison. Facebook and LinkedIn do not have an entity like the Food & Drug Administration (FDA) that sends years of data to the trashcan more frequently than it approves a product for use. Nor do many technologies reckon with the complex reimbursement issues faced by products utilized within the healthcare system.
  Read the rest of this entry »

Tags: , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Our Views | No Comments »





Five Great Healthcare and MedTech Info Resources

March 28th, 2011
Posted by

With the abundance of information available online today, sometimes it’s hard to sort through the SPAM to find quality sources of news and opinions, particularly if you want to stay current on trends and policies in healthcare and medical technology.  I’m here to help with some of my favorite sites for great info on these topics.  Add your picks to the comments, and together we can create a resource to sort through the junk.
 
The Healthcare Blog: WebMd dubs this blog “a free-wheeling discussion of the latest healthcare developments.” I enjoyed last week’s post on “The Incredible and Wasteful Complexity of the U.S. Healthcare System,” which provided a brief and twistedly entertaining look at the mishmash of laws, regulations, and other pieces that combine to create complexity and inefficiency in the U.S. healthcare system.
 
MedGadget.com: The “internet journal of emerging medical technologies” has something for anyone interested in gadgets and medicine. A recent article spoke of new medical scrubs featuring fabric patterns based on micrographs of pathogens. What an opportune way for every nurse, medical student and hospital staffer to stand out from the crowd.
  Read the rest of this entry »

Tags: , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Our Views | No Comments »





This Is Not Your Grandfather’s Big Diagnostics

February 7th, 2011
Posted by

Danaher Corporation (NYSE:DHR) announced today (see San Francisco Chronicle story here) that it has entered into an agreement with Beckman Coulter, Inc. (NYSE: BEC) to acquire Beckman for approximately $6.8 billion. When the acquisition is complete, Beckman will become part of Danaher’s Life Sciences and Diagnostics business segment.
 
This is yet another example of the diagnostics landscape’s rapid upheaval in which different players will clearly be dominating and leading the industry.
 
The diagnostics industry shake up is in full swing: As we wrote recently, sequencing technology (one critical part of the Dx space) is changing at an earth-shattering speed and today’s announcement is evidence of what is happening on the market level. Need more evidence? Check out this post by Xconomy’s Luke Timmerman on “diagnostics warming up.”
  Read the rest of this entry »

Tags: , , , , , , ,
Posted in Our Views | No Comments »





Cutting a Path Toward Product Development

January 9th, 2011
Posted by

A recent issue of The New Yorker included an interesting article by Jonah Lehrer entitled,  The Truth Wears Off—Is there something wrong with the scientific method? The article focuses on the “decline effect,” which has been observed and debated in various studies in disciplines ranging from psychology to pharmacology to biomedical research.  One of the observations is: As more trials were conducted with a given agent, the less efficacious that agent appeared.  In many cases, the agent was no better than its predecessor, even though the initial study results were significant.
 
Read the rest of this entry »

Tags: , , , , , , ,
Posted in Our Views | No Comments »





Health Care: Thoughts on Burrill’s 2011 “Converging Technology” Prognostication

January 4th, 2011
Posted by

When it comes to the life science industry, many have made 2011 predictions, including renowned biotech specialist, venture capitalist, and frequent public speaker Steve Burrill. It’s not all that surprising that he envisions much of what will happen in the year ahead will be based upon an environment that favors risk-mitigated companies, emerging biotechnology markets (e.g., Brazil and China), and challenges due to U.S. healthcare reform.
 
While I encourage you to take a look at his full list of predictions, I’m most interested in those that tie to some of the topics we’ve been discussing since we launched this blog in November, especially with regard to converging technologies.
 
Read the rest of this entry »

Tags: , , , , , , ,
Posted in Our Views | No Comments »