Posts Tagged ‘genomics’



And On the Digital Health Front…Influencers, Certification, Sensing & More

March 5th, 2013
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I originally shared this post as an announcement to the 15,000+ members of my Digital Health group on LinkedIn.
 
In this update:

     

  1. 15 Influencers Shaping Digital Health
  2. Happtique Mobile Health App Certification Program
  3. Making Sense of Sensors (Jane Sarasohn-Kahn on CHCF)
  4. X PRIZE’s Nokia Sensing X CHALLENGE – Application Deadline
  5. Upcoming Events: Future of Genomic Medicine VI Conference Read the rest of this entry »

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Compound- to Target-Centric: A New View of Drug Discovery with H3 Biomedicine CEO Markus Warmuth

October 29th, 2012
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The cost and risk associated with biopharmaceutical R&D is enormous and the rewards are increasingly elusive. For many young firms, the “valley of death” is a very real obstacle. What can startups (and larger companies) do? In the first blog post based on my interview with H3 Biomedicine CEO Markus Warmuth, we discussed H3’s strategy to propel innovative therapies into the market using a tighter time frame based upon a new research and clinical paradigm that is almost the reverse of traditional biopharmaceutical development. In this segment, Warmuth shares with us some specifics about H3 Biomedicine’s unique approach to drug development.
 

Q: What is the current approach to drug discovery at H3?
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Digital Health Gets Extended (Television) Coverage

September 26th, 2012
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Digital health is propelled by many different drivers: genomics research that allows for inexpensive, accurate sequencing (and biomarker discovery), smart phone and internet technology that provides consumers with access, and the increased power of consumers to demand remote healthcare services. Perhaps as a symptom of this increased demand (or at least awareness), we’ve observed digital health as a topic on two popular television shows.
 
Recently, Dr. Eric Topol, author of The Creative Destruction of Medicine and an advocate of these drivers who provides much commentary on digital health, appeared on the television show The Doctors. What was significant about this appearance?

     

  • He reached a large, mostly consumer audience with the message of digital health and the innovations that are happening vis-à-vis empowerment provided to patients by mobile devices.
  • He introduced biomarkers for certain diseases and the sensing technologies for them, and showed how powerful the combination can be in disease prediction and prevention.
  • By illustrating the power of a smart-phone attached electrocardiogram, he underscored the notion that consumers/patients will be connected to their doctors remotely.

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Life Science Takeaways from JPM12, OneMedForum, CES Digital Health Summit

January 17th, 2012
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On the heels of our team’s attendance at some key conferences over the last several days, I had a chance to talk with my colleagues. Shane Climie attended the JP Morgan Healthcare Conference in San Francisco, Ken Walz participated in OneMedForum (across the street from the JP Morgan conference), and both Ken and Paul Sonnier were at the Digital Health Summit in Las Vegas.
 Following are the highlights from my post-conference discussions with the team:
 

CP: Paul, tell us what happened in Vegas that shouldn’t stay in Vegas?

 

PS: There were two themes that will—and should—escape Vegas and transform our health. The first theme, digital health, was underscored by Eric Topol’s keynote address and hardcover book release. This was the most cogent expression I’ve seen of the convergence of consumer health, clinical care, research, and life sciences. Greg Lucier, CEO of Life Technologies, illustrated the second theme with his announcement of the company’s new $1,000 genome sequencer, which has the ability to be used in a doctor’s office. Lucier explained that technology is moving medicine into the “genetics age.”
 
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Three Conferences, Two Cities, One Vision of Healthcare’s Future?

January 6th, 2012
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To kick off the New Year, we’re attending three key conferences next week. Ken Walz and I will be in San Francisco, so we can tap into both the JP Morgan Healthcare Conference and OneMedForum, and Popper and Co. guest blogger Paul Sonnier will be at the Digital Health Summit, which is held along with the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.
 
Following are some of our thoughts as we prepare to take off.
 
Ken: Every year we look forward to the JP Morgan Healthcare Conference as an opportunity to renew industry acquaintances, look for business opportunities on behalf of our clients and to do a pulse-check on the outlook for the coming year. The overall sentiment at JPM is often cited as an industry barometer and by Tuesday or Wednesday we’ll all be reading and hearing about “the mood at JP Morgan.” Hopefully, this year that mood will be “optimistic.”
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Assessing the Evidence for Genomics

June 2nd, 2011
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Genomic research is accelerating at a rapid pace and improvements in technology are fueling these advances (as has previously been addressed within the Popper and Co. blog). We’re now entering a phase of evaluating how to incorporate translated genomic information into clinical testing. With this comes a critical need to verify how and when to use a test, how these tests can modify clinical care, and how this process translates into improved outcomes for patients.
 
In April, Margaret Piper, Ph.D., M.P.H., presented at the Personalized Medicine Partnerships Conference outside of Washington, DC.  Dr. Piper is director, genomic resources, at the Technology Evaluation Center of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield (BCBS) Association. Her presentation, “Assessing the Evidence for Genomics: Focus on the Patient,” centered on the impact of genomics on administrative processes and the adoption of new technologies into clinical care. As Dr. Piper noted, “We’re generating a lot of information that relates genomics to disease, but we’re only just starting to gather information on how to translate this into treatments and medical decision making.”
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Tapping Personalized Health Care’s Potential

April 6th, 2011
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“Translating the knowledge we are gaining from gene discoveries into practical clinical and public health applications will be critical for realizing the potential of personalized health care and improving the health of the nation.”
 
— Muin J. Khoury, M.D., Ph.D., Director, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control & Prevention
 
There are several interesting and exciting developments in personalized health that extend well beyond clinical medicine and into areas of science, ethics, government policy and regulation, patient advocacy, and business.   In January of this year, the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation published The Personalized Health Project—Identifying the gaps between discovery and application in the life sciences, and proposed solutions. This report provides insights from key thought leaders as to how far we have come, where there are gaps and barriers, and how far away we are from reaching the goal of implementing personalized health care solutions.
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Benlysta: Long & Winding Road to Genomics’ Payoff

March 16th, 2011
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On March 9, 2011, the U.S. Food & Drug Administration approved Benlysta® (benlimumab) for the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus. Benlysta is the first new drug approved for the treatment of lupus in more than 50 years: a triumph of genomic medicine. The drug was born of a partnership, dating back some 18 years, between biotech Human Genome Sciences and multinational pharma GSK. The Benlysta story is an interesting example of how molecular biology and genomic technologies can be applied to create new treatments for challenging diseases, even though the timeline extended well beyond what was anticipated by the lofty projections made in the earliest days of genomic medicine some 20 years ago.
 
Benlysta is a monoclonal antibody that was developed by HGS and GSK from antibodies that were provided by Cambridge Antibody Technology (which was acquired by AstraZeneca and is now part of AZ’s biologics arm, MedImmune). It acts against B-lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS), which is believed to increase the production of white cells that attack healthy tissue in lupus patients.
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