Posts Tagged ‘healthcare innovation’



Congratulations to Withings!

January 22nd, 2016
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Congratulations to our client, Withings, for being honored with the 2016 CES Innovation Awards in two categories, as well as being given the ‘Best of CES’ Awards from many major publications. Withings hit the press jackpot with their two latest innovations:
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Under Armour Leaps into Digital Health with MapMyFitness Acquisition

November 14th, 2013
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Today, leading sports performance company Under Armour (NYSE:UA) announced the acquisition of MapMyFitness, the fitness technology company powering one of the world’s largest digital fitness communities.
 
Under Armour announced in a press release, “With this acquisition, Under Armour will be uniquely positioned at the forefront of sports and technology and will continue to deliver game-changing solutions to how athletes train and perform. As part of the collaboration, Under Armour will add depth to its digital capability, offering athletes an elevated training experience through new digital products and platforms.”
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MyHealthTeams CEO Eric Peacock on Social Media in Healthcare, Part II

November 5th, 2013
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Part Two—Interview with Eric Peacock, CEO, Co-founder, MyHealthTeams
 
Eric Peacock co-founded the social networking company MyHealthTeams to help people suffering from chronic conditions find better ways to communicate with each other and share valuable information. In 2011, the company began with the launch of MyAutismTeam, an interactive social media site serving parents of people with autism. It has since expanded, launching MyBCTeam to help women diagnosed with breast cancer and MyMSTeam for multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, and Peacock plans to create many more sites for people living with certain chronic conditions. In Part One, we discussed the creation of MyHealthTeams, what role social media can play in patient-centric healthcare spaces, and how this concept became popular. In Part Two of our interview, we talk about how the sites work, and the untapped potential of the Internet to provide meaningful social interactions for patients, and their families and friends.
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MyHealthTeams CEO Eric Peacock Offers New Function for Social Media in Healthcare

October 24th, 2013
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Part One—Interview with Eric Peacock, CEO, Co-founder, MyHealthTeams
 
Eric Peacock co-founded the social site company MyHealthTeams to help people suffering from chronic diseases and their friends and families find better ways to communicate with each other and share valuable information. In 2011, the company began with the launch of MyAutismTeam, an interactive social media site serving parents of people with autism. It has since expanded to help women diagnosed with breast cancer and with multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, and Peacock plans to create many more disease-specific sites. We talked with Eric about his plans and the role of social media in healthcare.
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Strategic Steps Two and Three on Creating your Big Picture

June 11th, 2013
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Albert Einstein once said, “The process of scientific discovery is, in effect, a continual flight from wonder.” While product development processes differ from scientific discovery, they still can be a subject of wonder for many a life science executive. In a previous Popper and Company post, I addressed the first step toward successfully introducing a new product or service, namely knowing where you are in the process. In this post, I’ll cover two more important steps to commercialization: determining the right partner and refining your strategy.
 
Step Two: Pick your partner (and your partnership arrangement) wisely
When looking to commercialize a healthcare innovation, the first item of consideration for most life science companies is usually money. But a number of other important issues need to be addressed before positive cash flow becomes a reality. One matter is looking for organizations or people who can help you. The most common need of a new enterprise or startup organization is a partner with development expertise that you and your firm may lack.
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In Healthcare, Reframing Ideas Can Yield Innovation

May 13th, 2013
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While the word “revolution” is used often during a period of rapid, intense innovation such as the one we are currently experiencing in healthcare, it can be helpful to step back to see what’s sparking the revolution. The answer may lie in the word, “frame.”
 
From a medical or scientific student’s traditional lessons in genetics (specifically, frame shift mutations), to changes in our perspective on a problem, frames make very significant impacts. Defined as a conceptual structure used in thinking, a frame helps us give an issue or problem borders, shape and structure.
 
This cognitive tool, while useful for our brains, also creates limitations. The linguist George Lakoff points out that every word in our language evokes a certain frame. And once evoked, other words reinforce that frame in our minds, until the image or concept is so strong that we can’t see through or around it.
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Healthcare’s Next Big Innovation Could be Right in Our Hands

May 7th, 2013
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When seeking healthcare innovations, it’s traditional to look first at basic science, then clinical research, or at engineers tinkering with new devices. But this view might be a little too narrow, as advances with the greatest impact may come from industries that have nothing to do with healthcare.
 
Take Purell, for example. Ohio-based Gojo Industries designed the now-ubiquitous hand-sanitizing gel for auto mechanics. And it was almost a failure; mechanics and consumers alike first rejected the product as a little strange, and nobody, including the U.S. Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, originally believed that alcohol-based cleaners provided more value than plain old soap and water.
 
But Purell started to take off when nurses who used it in hospitals started requesting more samples. The nurses had been looking for an antiseptic alternative to stringent, frequent washing with soap and water, which was very tough on hands. Now, not only has Purell (and other alcohol-based cleaners) been approved by the CDC, it is selling by the hundreds of millions of dollars each year; Gojo even has a test hospital lab to find more uses for the cleaning gel.
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When Seeking Partners, Look for the un-Usual Suspects

April 1st, 2013
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For many new and growing companies, it’s not enough to have a plan for identifying strategic partners. You also need to successfully implement the plan—and that’s often easier said than done.
 
Reaching your company goals will no doubt require more capital, perhaps new investors to inject that capital, more third-party involvement, and probably a partner to help with product commercialization. New outside stakeholders add another dimension to your goals; now you’ll need to see how your product/service fits into someone else’s strategy.
 
How do you find the right fit? The answer actually lies in getting creative in a way that expands the universe of potential partners.
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Designing for Women – Are They More Efficient Thinkers?

March 13th, 2013
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Scientists have puzzled over cognitive differences between men and women for at least 100 years. And the results of their work support the reality that should be on the minds of everyone working in healthcare; one size doesn’t fit all.
 
Researchers in Madrid and at UCLA recently tested men and women on cognitive tasks, including spatial reasoning, inductive reasoning, keeping track of tasks, and attention to numbers. Women, although they have smaller brains ­– and most importantly because of its role in memory, emotion and reason – a smaller hippocampus than men, ­­­were nonetheless better able to handle most of these tasks (except spatial), while showing less brain activity on an MRI. Thus, women require less neural material (and energy) to perform cognitive tasks on an equal level with men.
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The Physician’s New World of Consumer-Driven Healthcare: A View from Eric Topol

September 25th, 2012
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We’ve had a lot of discussions about the waves of changes happening in healthcare, thanks to smartphone- and internet-fueled consumer power. In a recent Popper and Company post, Caroline Popper discussed how consumers’ access to information, expectations from the medical profession, focus on wellness (instead of disease) and determination of value are changing the industry.
 
Dr. Eric Topol, author of The Creative Destruction of Medicine, presented another face of this consumer-driven change; the effects on doctors. In this Medscape video presentation, Dr. Topol suggests that doctors, no longer the sole holder of personal health information, will need to change how they approach their practices as well as their patients.
 
Consumers are getting health information from many sources. For example, companies like Walgreens are increasing the information content of their consumer interactions. By educating its customers on the data generated by the devices Walgreens sells, patients have more knowledge of their own condition – and a knowledge base that does not start with the physician. Thus, the patient enters the doctor’s office with a more thorough basis of information and more challenging questions. This information base may make physicians uncomfortable, just as direct-to-consumer ads from the pharmaceutical industry have discomforted many. But, as Dr. Topol points out, physicians will continue to have an important role; it’s just going to be a different one.’
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