Posts Tagged ‘illumina’



Roche’s Proposed Takeover of Illumina—Game On for Universal DNA Sequencing?

February 3rd, 2012
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There appears to be a full-scale race underway to bring affordable next-gen DNA sequencing into diagnostics and clinical medicine, as demonstrated over the past week or so by Roche’s hostile $5.7 billion-dollar bid for Illumina.  Roche’s move should come as no shock. The multi-national healthcare giant has been a leader in diagnostics by virtue of several earlier acquisitions. But this action signifies a formal acknowledgment that next-gen sequencing will be part of the diagnostic and clinical toolbox—perhaps sooner than we thought.
 
Roche’s aggressive move may be motivated by an optimism that arose from whole genome-sequencing on the individual level. We noted this rising tide of optimism early last year, and many advances have been reported since then. We’re certainly seeing many examples of the application of next-gen sequencing to diagnose disease and to help match the right drugs to the right patients. Examples of companies that are staking claims over the early application of targeted sequencing of specific panels of genes for diagnostics include our client Multiplicom, which develops CE-marked, multiplexed PCR kits to generate templates for next-gen sequencing, and Foundation Medicine, which is using targeted sequencing to help diagnose certain cancers and to guide the treatment of cancer patients.
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DNA Sequencing – Now It’s Getting (Even More) Personal!

January 31st, 2011
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“We said that once we had finished sequencing the genome we would make it available to the scientific community for free. …And we will be doing that on Monday morning at 10am.” – J. Craig Venter, February, 2001
 
It’s been ten years since the famous unveiling of the first human genome sequence. Since then, we’ve developed the ability to sequence large numbers of individual human genomes thanks to rapidly changing technology that translates into ever lower costs per genome and higher throughput sequencing capabilities. The $10,000 genome has arrived – even sooner than anticipated – and now the challenge is to figure out what to do with all of the information that is starting to accumulate.
 
The past year has seen a number of key developments and there are no signs that things will slow down over the coming months:
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