Posts Tagged ‘life science’



A New Healthcare Model Rising from Tradition’s Ashes (and Tim Berners-Lee)

September 10th, 2012
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Marketing is dead,” proclaims a recent Harvard Business Review blog post, adding that traditional marketing (i.e., advertising, corporate communications, PR, overall branding) doesn’t work anymore. Consumers are finding more personal ways to make buying decisions and increasingly do not value general “push” efforts (other than perhaps to become aware of a product/service).
 
But what of healthcare? The perspective in the HBR post helps us understand that traditional provider-dominated sharing of healthcare services is also dead. We’re beyond the point of believing what we’re told, particularly if the person doing the telling is a representative of a company and thereby being paid to endorse a particular product or service.
 
Instead, the model has shifted to one of validation. Consumers conduct research, join online community groups, and listen to trusted influencers. These developments are everywhere now:  discussion groups (e.g. PatientsLikeMe), which connect people by diseases, can often provide more information on an individual’s specific symptom/disease than physicians who, limited by time, tend to be more generally focused.
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Three Steps Toward Actualizing the White House’s Bioeconomy

May 7th, 2012
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The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) recently released its “National Bioeconomy Blueprint”—a detailed proposal on how advances in our knowledge of biology and biotechnology have spurred significant enough economic activity (e.g., labor, capital and resources) to create a new type of economy for the United States.
 
While the report focused on many areas outside of healthcare, the following three points struck me as significant for those of us who spend our time thinking about life sciences:

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Employee Devices + Mobile Healthcare Information = A Quiet, Perfect Storm

April 19th, 2012
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As the founder of the 10,000+-member Digital Health group on LinkedIn, I can’t help but see that there’s a perfect storm brewing in healthcare, and it’s one with surprisingly little turbulence. As we see more employees in healthcare (whether it’s pharma, a hospital, or device and diagnostics sales) demanding to use their personal devices on the job, we’re also seeing technology and drug developers embracing the use of mobile devices in the field. Now, the big data that traditionally was accessed only from headquarters is being downloaded, wirelessly transmitted, and read by employees across the healthcare spectrum through social networks and the Internet from the clinic, laboratory, office and road.
 
This is the digital revolution in healthcare: not only are Microsoft® products ceasing to become the predominant platform for healthcare employees, providers and consumers, the decisions to adopt certain technologies are being made by employees, providers, and customers (and less often by the corporate IT department). For example:

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Life Science Takeaways from JPM12, OneMedForum, CES Digital Health Summit

January 17th, 2012
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On the heels of our team’s attendance at some key conferences over the last several days, I had a chance to talk with my colleagues. Shane Climie attended the JP Morgan Healthcare Conference in San Francisco, Ken Walz participated in OneMedForum (across the street from the JP Morgan conference), and both Ken and Paul Sonnier were at the Digital Health Summit in Las Vegas.
 Following are the highlights from my post-conference discussions with the team:
 

CP: Paul, tell us what happened in Vegas that shouldn’t stay in Vegas?

 

PS: There were two themes that will—and should—escape Vegas and transform our health. The first theme, digital health, was underscored by Eric Topol’s keynote address and hardcover book release. This was the most cogent expression I’ve seen of the convergence of consumer health, clinical care, research, and life sciences. Greg Lucier, CEO of Life Technologies, illustrated the second theme with his announcement of the company’s new $1,000 genome sequencer, which has the ability to be used in a doctor’s office. Lucier explained that technology is moving medicine into the “genetics age.”
 
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Three Conferences, Two Cities, One Vision of Healthcare’s Future?

January 6th, 2012
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To kick off the New Year, we’re attending three key conferences next week. Ken Walz and I will be in San Francisco, so we can tap into both the JP Morgan Healthcare Conference and OneMedForum, and Popper and Co. guest blogger Paul Sonnier will be at the Digital Health Summit, which is held along with the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.
 
Following are some of our thoughts as we prepare to take off.
 
Ken: Every year we look forward to the JP Morgan Healthcare Conference as an opportunity to renew industry acquaintances, look for business opportunities on behalf of our clients and to do a pulse-check on the outlook for the coming year. The overall sentiment at JPM is often cited as an industry barometer and by Tuesday or Wednesday we’ll all be reading and hearing about “the mood at JP Morgan.” Hopefully, this year that mood will be “optimistic.”
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A Strategic Lesson in a Tale of Two Drugstores

November 29th, 2011
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Have you noticed the very different strategic paths taken here of late by Walgreens and CVS, the national drugstore chains? What’s happened so far is a lesson in strategy and the importance of considering unintended consequences and long-term implications. For me, this drugstore case study evokes the old adage, “Be careful what you wish for.”
 
A recent article in Forbes magazine compares the stock performance of CVS and Walgreens, in an attempt to measure how each chain’s strategic decision around its pharmacy benefit managers (PBMs) program affected both how well each could negotiate terms and prices with insurers as well as its overall pharmacy sales. PBMs are designed to help a drugstore chain win a price advantage over competing chains.
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#BIO2011: After the Party is Over

June 30th, 2011
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For the thousands of  life science industry representatives who attend the Biotechnology Industry Organization Annual Convention each year, the last few days have been similar to a favorite holiday: exciting, long-awaited, and too quickly over. As we wrap up our #BIO2011 experience and say good-bye to Washington, DC, I took a few moments to look back on many inspiring networking and learning opportunities only available at this kind of international event.
 
Within the span of a few days, my colleague Caroline Popper and I have been able to meet with clients, colleagues and new contacts from states such as Michigan, California, Texas, and Massachusetts.  Furthermore, a large exhibit hall showcasing different regions of the world’s biotech industry has been an extraordinary venue to network with international visitors. I traveled to DC from my office in Toronto, and was able to meet with life science representatives from Australia, New Zealand, Spain, and Italy, sharing with them ideas and guidance for how to establish a presence in North America.
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Expert’s View: Trends in Trans-Atlantic Life Science Technology

June 7th, 2011
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In my May 17 blog post, I introduced Dr. Andreas Muehler as one of Popper and Co.’s new strategic advisors. Dr. Muehler brings broad perspectives and business insights, owing in part to his close relationships with established industry leaders in the joint development and commercialization of medical products worldwide. Building upon our last discussion, where I was caught by his enthusiasm as we talked about his past role as CEO for a struggling medical device firm and his experiences positioning products in the global marketplace, I recently talked with Dr. Muehler again to further explore his impressions on the differences between the E.U. and U.S. markets for new life science technologies.
 
CP:  You’ve served within or supported the pharmaceutical and medical device industries in both Europe and the U.S. What do you see as some of the differences?

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