Posts Tagged ‘mobile health’



A Meeting of Minds on the Value of Healthcare IT

February 19th, 2014
Posted by

As healthcare providers face challenges from empowered patients, the increasing impact of the internet and mobile technology on patient care, and more outcomes-focused regulatory requirements, the role of information technology in healthcare has never been more important. To both gain more perspective and to help align Popper and Company’s strategies with the latest advances and issues, I will be attending the annual HIMSS14 (Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society) conference in Orlando starting next week.
 
At Popper and Company, we’ve helped guide our clients around a wide range of healthcare IT issues, ranging from mobile health, to patient engagement, to establishing the value of healthcare IT—all “hot topics” at this year’s HIMSS meeting. I expect that some of the issues we’ve discussed in the past will be part of this year’s conference, namely:
 
Read the rest of this entry »

Tags: , , , ,
Posted in Events, Our Views | No Comments »





From Huffington Post’s Health News – “The Long-Awaited Revolution: Digital Health Innovation”

May 1st, 2013
Posted by

On April 24, XPRIZE and Nokia announced that I was among the mobile health and sensing industry leaders named to the Nokia Sensing XCHALLENGE Judging Panel.
 
It’s a great honor for me to take on this role – and to work with the XPRIZE and Nokia teams in helping drive awareness of this important competition and the role of digital health innovation as part of the long-awaited revolution in healthcare.
  Read the rest of this entry »

Tags: , , ,
Posted in Our Views | No Comments »





Consumers to Battle the Healthcare Gods

July 25th, 2012
Posted by

There’s a joke that’s often shared by medical students: “What’s the difference between God and a doctor? God doesn’t think he’s a doctor.” Regardless of your spiritual orientation, the line illustrates the lofty perch (and decision-making power) occupied by physicians in today’s healthcare settings. But, as we at Popper and Co. have discussed, a new wave of consumer power may eventually topple this perch.
 
A recent story in the Wall Street Journal by author Doc Searls, “The Customer as a God,” focused on the growing power of customers using electronic devices for daily communication, shopping and other activities. Most current product development, the article points out, focuses on improving the supply of products to the customer, not involving the customer in making those products. This however, is changing. The story projected a future in which people use their devices to pick out clothes, replace parts for appliances, and shop for products—all unencumbered by invasive marketing tracking methods, corporate service plans, and other systems that, as Searls says, “tend to herd customers as if they were cattle.”
  Read the rest of this entry »

Tags: , , , , , , ,
Posted in Our Views | No Comments »





The Walgreens’ Way to Mobile Healthcare

July 10th, 2012
Posted by

At Popper and Company, we’ve watched and commented upon how the Walgreens drugstore chain has developed unique strategies, from prescription price negotiations to bringing pharmacists and customers closer together. Now, the chain is exploring ways its stores can better distribute and educate their customers on medical devices and the emerging world of mobile healthcare. In this post, I share highlights from my interview with Dr. Jay Rosan, VP of Health Innovation at Walgreens.
 
Is Walgreen’s moving into mobile health?

Most people view Walgreens as the community pharmacy—we have nearly 8,000 such stores. About two-thirds of Americans live within three miles of a Walgreens. We also have more than 350 retail clinics. We are one of the top specialty pharma retailers in the country, and the largest provider of workplace health and wellness centers in the U.S., with about 360 locations including many Fortune 500 companies. We are the closest place to home (for many Americans) so we have a lot of­­­ opportunities to facilitate personal health.
  Read the rest of this entry »

Tags: , , , , , , ,
Posted in Our Views | No Comments »





Employee Devices + Mobile Healthcare Information = A Quiet, Perfect Storm

April 19th, 2012
Posted by

As the founder of the 10,000+-member Digital Health group on LinkedIn, I can’t help but see that there’s a perfect storm brewing in healthcare, and it’s one with surprisingly little turbulence. As we see more employees in healthcare (whether it’s pharma, a hospital, or device and diagnostics sales) demanding to use their personal devices on the job, we’re also seeing technology and drug developers embracing the use of mobile devices in the field. Now, the big data that traditionally was accessed only from headquarters is being downloaded, wirelessly transmitted, and read by employees across the healthcare spectrum through social networks and the Internet from the clinic, laboratory, office and road.
 
This is the digital revolution in healthcare: not only are Microsoft® products ceasing to become the predominant platform for healthcare employees, providers and consumers, the decisions to adopt certain technologies are being made by employees, providers, and customers (and less often by the corporate IT department). For example:

Tags: , , , , , ,
Posted in Our Views | 1 Comment »





Digital Meets Health

December 14th, 2011
Posted by

Last week I attended the 3rd annual mHealth Summit in Washington, D.C. Organized by the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH), this multi-track conference attracted some 3,600 attendees and included representatives from across the health innovation spectrum, including industry, investors, entrepreneurs, policy makers, standards, NGOs, mobile operators, wireless technology producers, healthcare systems, insurers, pharma, regulators, researchers, and a multitude of others with an interest in the burgeoning space of ‘mHealth.’
 
While the lexicon for mHealth (an amalgam of “mobile” and “health”) is diverse and overlapping, a natural theme emerges if we look at the genesis of the term. The PC and ever-smaller, more powerful computer microprocessors spawned the digital revolution. Recently, we’ve seen the mobile revolution taking hold, wherein digital tools and wireless technologies have converged to allow us to be connected consumers, patients, and professionals. Now we are seeing a digital health revolution, wherein mobile, and the connectivity it provides for us, is enabling a new paradigm for health. Moreover, this phenomenon is spreading throughout the entire life sciences and health care ecosystem, including all strategics. To characterize all of this as simply being a combination of mobile and health is not only ambiguous (the term “mobile” has often been used interchangeably to mean a cell phone or mobility), but is somewhat disingenuous to the fundamentals that are driving this paradigm shift. Of course, mHealth is a very catchy and accessible term – and proponents have steadily broadened its meaning – so it’s often easier to make a concession in many modes of communication rather than fight a good-natured but losing battle!
  Read the rest of this entry »

Tags: , , , , , , ,
Posted in Guest Posts | 2 Comments »